Short Courses

Year 1 Short Courses

Short Courses Offered in 2020 Fall Semester

AE 103 Backpacking: This course is an introduction to backpacking and backcountry travel techniques. The course includes choosing clothing and equipment, Leave No Trace principles, reading and understanding physical terrain and maps, trail selection, stove use, time management, emergency response plans, and basic cooking. A multiple overnight trip is required.

CL 105 Search and Rescue: In this course you will be introduced to the basic concepts and techniques of Search and Rescue in the wilderness setting. You will gain a general understanding of new mapping techniques used to assist with tracking.

ES 103 Land Navigation: The skills introduced in this course may be used on Earth, the moon, or any other planetary body in the known universe in order to describe a person/object/event’s physical location, the location of a desired destination, and the path that will be taken to that destination. Students will learn to use low-tech (maps, compasses, and trigonometric rules) and high-tech (Global Positioning Systems) aids and techniques to navigate across three dimensional terrains and to document their journey in map form.
Required for entering Fall 2020 students for the following degree majors:  Adventure-Based Environmental Education, Adventure Therapy, Conservation Law Enforcement, Parks and Forest Resources

PA 101 Homesteading: Self-sufficient, resourceful, living from the land, resilient, connected to nature, and having a minimal ecological footprint are traits of the homesteader. A diverse skill set covering the many practical arts also marks out a seasoned homesteader. Students will explore a broad array of practical arts from animal husbandry to canning to solar installation, and may also investigate the applicability of homesteading ideals in the urban wilderness.

WF 101 Introduction to Captive Wildlife Care and Education: In this class, students will begin to understand the issues and realities of caring for wild animals in a captive setting. They will learn basic principles and best care practices of captive wildlife care through in-class activities and by speaking with professionals in the field. They will apply these concepts to an educational animal-handling presentation completed in a public setting. They will also examine current literature, ethics, and career opportunities related to animals in human care.
Required for entering Fall 2020 students in the following degree majors: Captive Wildlife Care and Education 

WF 123 Fish ID: This course is designed to provide students with fish identification skills and knowledge of regional freshwater and diadromous fish species. Students will develop skills and an overall system and learn how to use generalized identification key for identifying fish. Characteristics of major taxonomic groups within the fish families will provide the basis to approach species-level identification. Emphasis will focus on the families and genera of species found in Maine and New England. This course is “hands on” and lab-intensive; field exercises will provide fresh specimens for identification.
Entering Fall 2020 Students majoring in Wildlife Biology or Wildlife and Fisheries Management are required to complete any two identification courses. 

WF 124 Amphibian and Reptile ID: This course is designed to provide students with the tools to identify the major groups of reptiles and amphibians in Maine. It covers physical appearance and ID features, regional ecology, distribution, legal protection and basic survey techniques. Emphasis will focus on the families, genera, and species found in Maine. This course is “hands on” and lab-intensive; field exercises will provide fresh specimens for identification.
Entering Fall 2020 Students majoring in Wildlife Biology or Wildlife and Fisheries Management are required to complete any two identification courses. 

 

Short Courses Offered in 2021 Spring Semester

AR 201 Painting: The purpose of this course is to immerse you in an investigation of the nature of paint and color, a variety of painting materials, formal problems, and to foster your own creative process in regards to ideas and content. You will paint from observation as well as develop methods for making work from research (both external and internal). Color will be examined in the light of science as well as cultural and psychological sources. Contemporary and historic examples of painting will be presented in class.

BI 180 Microscopy: A quintessential tool of life and physical scientists the microscope has brought whole new worlds into focus. This course will introduce students to the basic use of light optical microscopes and their applications, beginning with the basics of optics, then working through the how, when and why to use reflected, transmitted, and fluorescent light, and concluding with the capturing and processing of digital images of the microscopic world.

CL 105 Search and Rescue: In this course you will be introduced to the basic concepts and techniques of Search and Rescue in the wilderness setting. You will gain a general understanding of new mapping techniques used to assist with tracking.

ES 103 Land Navigation: The skills introduced in this course may be used on Earth, the moon, or any other planetary body in the known universe in order to describe a person/object/event’s physical location, the location of a desired destination, and the path that will be taken to that destination. Students will learn to use low-tech (maps, compasses, and trigonometric rules) and high-tech (Global Positioning Systems) aids and techniques to navigate across three dimensional terrains and to document their journey in map form.
Required for entering Fall 2020 students in the following degree majors: Adventure-Based Environmental Education, Adventure Therapy, Conservation Law Enforcement, Parks and Forest Resource

GL 100 Physical Geology: Physical Geology is the gateway course to the geosciences and serves to introduce students to the fundamental components of the Earth-Atmosphere system: basic principles of geology, mapping, glaciers, soils, rocks and minerals, surface and groundwater systems, and natural hazards. Geosciences is a discipline that emphasizes observation and visualization; hence, lectures are riddled with images, animations, and schematics to aid in understanding the natural landscape. Labs will consist of field trips and provide an opportunity to experience more hands-on, applied learning opportunities. To reinforce critical concepts, Applications in Physical Geology (APG) exercises are a key component of this course. Students should possess basic reading, comprehension, and computation skills in order to successfully complete this course and its lab components, and above all, possess a willingness to be challenged, learn, and enjoy their classroom and lab experiences.
Required for entering Fall 2020 students in the following degree majors: Earth and Environmental Science 

WF 101 Introduction to Captive Wildlife Care and Education: In this class, students will begin to understand the issues and realities of caring for wild animals in a captive setting. They will learn basic principles and best care practices of captive wildlife care through in-class activities and by speaking with professionals in the field. They will apply these concepts to an educational animal-handling presentation completed in a public setting. They will also examine current literature, ethics, and career opportunities related to animals in human care.
Required for entering Fall 2020 students in the following degree majors: Captive Wildlife Care and Education 

WF 123 Fish ID: This course is designed to provide students with fish identification skills and knowledge of regional freshwater and diadromous fish species. Students will develop skills and an overall system and learn how to use generalized identification key for identifying fish. Characteristics of major taxonomic groups within the fish families will provide the basis to approach species-level identification. Emphasis will focus on the families and genera of species found in Maine and New England. This course is “hands on” and lab-intensive; field exercises will provide fresh specimens for identification.
Entering Fall 2020 students majoring in Wildlife Biology or Wildlife and Fisheries Management are required to complete any two identification courses. 

WF 127 Mammal ID: This “hands on” course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary for identifying mammals that occupy New England, with a special focus on species of conservation and/or management concern. In addition to identifying mammals in photos, students will also learn to identify mammals by their hair, teeth, and bones.
Entering Fall 2020 students majoring in Wildlife Biology or Wildlife and Fisheries Management are required to complete any two identification courses. 

WF 128 Bird ID: This course is designed to provide students with bird identification skills and knowledge of regional bird species, with a special focus on managed species. Students will develop skills and an overall identification system as they learn how to use external features to identify birds. Characteristics of major taxonomic groups within the birds will provide the basis to approach species-level identification. Emphasis will focus on the families and genera of species found in Maine and New England. This course is “hands on” and lab-intensive.
Entering Fall 2020 students majoring in Wildlife Biology or Wildlife and Fisheries Management are required to complete any two identification courses.