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William Kovarik

William Kovarik

Professor of Environmental Communications/ Center for Environmental Arts and Humanities

William Kovarik - Professor of Environmental Communications Unity College
Phone: 207-509-7237
Email: wkovarik@unity.edu
Office: 204A Founders Hall South

Kovarik has broad teaching experience that is augmented by work for environmental and green technology groups and news reporting.  His professional credentials include journalism, digital media, and community information services. Kovarik has trained scientists to effectively address traditional and new media.  Among his many projects is setting up small windmills for an agricultural cooperative in Virginia.  He holds a Ph.D. in Public Communication from the University of Maryland, M.A. in Communication from the University of South Carolina, and  B.S. in Journalism from Virginia Commonwealth University.

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Womersley and his Sustainable Energy students work on the analysis of renewable energy and energy policy in general, in climate mitigation, and in local renewable energy planning.
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Mick Womersley

Mick Womersley

Professor of Human Ecology/ Center for Sustainability and Global Change

Unity College Professor Mick Womersley
Phone: 207-509-7259
Email: mwomersley@unity.edu
Office: Parsons Wing, Office 203

Academic Background

PhD, Policy Studies, University of Maryland
MS, Resource Conservation, University of Montana Forestry School
BA, Biology, University of Montana
ONC 2cr (AS eq), Aeronautical Engineering, Royal Air Force College Halton

Born in northern England, Mick served in the Royal Air Force from 1978-1985 as an aircraft technician and mountain rescue specialist. He guided in Montana for two years prior to attending the University of Montana for a biology degree and a master's in Resource Conservation from the Forestry School. He then went on to the University of Maryland Policy School, where he studied under Peter G. Brown, Herman Daly, Mark Sagoff, Steve Fetter, and Carmen Reinhart, among other important academics working in the nexus between sustainability, ethics, and economics. He graduated with distinctions in normative analysis and economics in the year 2002, following successful completion of a dissertation on American religiosity and climate science acceptance. After a short stint at the University of Georgia's Institute of Ecology, Mick came to Unity College to help develop the sustainability programs in the year 2000. He teaches classes in climate change, sustainability, economics, and energy. His current research interests are in wind power assessment and mapping. Each summer he runs a field program in wind measurements to support this work, using students as crew members. He is also the faculty advisor to the Unity College Search and Rescue Team, Resource Officer for Maine Search and Rescue, and co-editor of the Royal Air Force Mountain Rescue Association's annual journal "On the Hill."

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The biology major provides opportunities for students who are fascinated with living organisms to develop their passion.
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Dave Potter

Dave Potter

Professor of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences/ Center for Biodiversity

Phone: 207-509-7130
Email: dpotter@unity.edu
Office: Founders Hall South, Office 217

Academic Background

PhD Zoology, University of Montana, Missoula MT
MA Zoology, University of Montana, Missoula MT
BS Biology, Union College, Schenectady NY

David Potter's career includes graduate study of the zooplankton community in Flathead Lake in western Montana, description of primary productivity in alkaline prairie lakes east of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and teaching at University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point and Unity College.  His research interests include examination of introductions of exotic species especially the Mysis that significantly altered zooplankton and fish communities in Flathead Lake and the reintroduction of alewives to eutrophic Unity Pond in Central Maine.

David teaches in the biodiversity and the natural resource management and protection centers at Unity College.  His primary responsibilities are in introductory biology, fisheries, and aquatic biology.  The Unity College curriculum provides a balance of theory, conceptual study, and practical application.  To support delivery of courses Dave introduces a complement of local, regional, and national citizen science projects.  Projects for introductory students include BirdSleuth through e-Bird at Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology and local projects with vernal pool amphibians and tallies of spring bird migration phenology.  Advanced science students pursue water quality monitoring in a eutrophic lake fed by perennial streams in a drainage characterized by logging and dairy farms, collection of voucher specimens for the Maine Damselfly and Dragonfly Survey (MDDS), and field sampling for state resource management agencies.  The local lake association and a regional land trust serve as community partners for student service learning projects related to nuisance algal blooms, nutrient dynamics, fish introductions, and public outreach.

Dave facilitates the student initiated White Sucker Project through ichthyology and fisheries techniques classes.  The white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, often thought to compete for food with game fish, is commercially fished in Maine for use as bait by lobster fishers.  Commercial exploitation of spawning suckers satisfies concerns that suckers compete with sportfish, but ignores the value of larval and juvenile suckers as food resources for the same sportfish.  Unity College students participate in a project to determine sucker population size, age and growth, migration distance, age at spawning, and fecundity.  The project supports study of sucker diseases and parasites, food habits, physiology, and behavior.  Fish are tagged with individually numbered tags or by fin clip at spawning and nursery sites or in the lake where most fish mature.  Preliminary results indicate suckers spawn repeatedly but on alternate years from age 9-20. 

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Benjamin Potter

Benjamin Potter

Professor of Art/ Center for Environmental Arts and Humanities

Unity College Professor Benjamin Potter
Phone: 207-509-7239
Email: bpotter@unity.edu
Office: Founders Hall South, Office 100

Academic Background

MFA, California College of the Arts
BA, Williams College

Ben Potter grew up in Sewanee TN, and both of his parents are teachers. He attended Williams College, where he double-majored in Fine Art and Biology. He also spent substantial time on the whitewater rivers of the Northeast.

After an internship with the New York Zoological Society on St. Catherine’s Island in Georgia, he decided to pursue a degree in art at the California College of the Arts in Oakland CA. After this MFA, he taught college courses in Vermont and Wisconsin before landing at Unity.

He lives in Belfast with his wife and three children, and can see the ocean in the wintertime from his house.

www.benpotter.net

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Christopher Marshall

Christopher Marshall

Professor of Anthropology/ Center for Environmental Arts and Humanities

Unity College Professor Christopher Marshall
Phone: 207-509-7254
Email: cmarshall@unity.edu
Office: Founders Hall South, Office 208A

Academic Background

Ph D, Anthropology, Cornell University
MA, Ethnomusicology, Indiana University
BA, Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

Chris has taught at Unity College since 1980. He has done ethnographic fieldwork with traditional musicians in Macedonia and Bulgaria, Maine Indian basket-makers, and recently with Waldo County residents on their criteria for evaluating local places. At present he researches the historical archaeology of early Euro-and Afro-American settlement in the Central Maine back-country, with emphasis on land-human interaction and landscape archaeology.

He lives with Susan his wife, and sometimes with his grown-up children, in the country in nearby Montville. Chris is involved with a local land trust, belongs to the local synagogue, practices shamanism and permaculture, collects mushrooms, sings in a hospice chorus, and has led a fifteen member balalaika orchestra playing Russian traditional music. He loves teaching best, though.

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Don Lynch

Don Lynch

Professor of Psychology/ Center for Experiential and Environmental Education

Unity College Professor Don Lynch
Phone: 207-509-7288
Email: dlynch@unity.edu
Office: Founders Hall South, Office 212

Academic Background

EdD, Counselor Education, University of Maine
MEd, Counselor Education, University of Maine
BA, Sociology, University of Maine

Don is a Professor of Psychology and has been teaching and providing clinical counseling services on campus for the past 26 years. Before coming to Unity College he served as the Clinical Director of Outpatient Mental Health Services at Community Health and Counseling Services in Bangor, Maine. He has worked for the Maine State Office of Substance Abuse as a contracted DEEP Instructor and has provided mental health training workshops to professional groups all over the United States. He has served as a consultant for the Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse in both Dallas and Austin, TX. He is also employed by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) as a College Board Advanced Placement Psychology Examination Reader. Currently, besides his work at Unity College, he teaches Adventure Therapy as an associate faculty member in the graduate schools at both Husson University and at the University of Maine.

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Doug Fox, Center Director for Sustainability and Global Change, guides students through a class on permaculture and sustainable landscaping.
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Doug Fox

Doug Fox

Professor of Sustainable Agriculture / Director of the Center for Sustainability and Global Change/ Center for Sustainability and Global Change

Unity College Professor Doug Fox
Phone: 207-509-7214
Email: dfox@unity.edu
Office: Koons Hall, Office 102

Academic Background

MS, Forestry, State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry
BS, Forestry Management, University of Maine

I’m a broadly interested teacher/learner with an interest in sustainability that goes back at least to the oil shock of 1973, when my dad bought a moped, we installed a woodstove, and I built my first solar oven. In graduate school I studied both silviculture (i.e., how to grow forests) and the energy economics of harvesting wood for fuel. Following graduate school I spent a year learning carpentry from some green builder friends who were very patient with me! We built a large passive solar home in upstate New York that is a model of sustainability.

I have been teaching agriculture courses—from landscape horticulture to arboriculture to organic gardening to forestry—at Unity College since 1991. My passion is to help students realize a partnership with nature so that both can thrive.

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Patricia Clark

Patricia Clark

Professor of Oral Communication/ Center for Environmental Arts and Humanities

Unity College Professor Patricia Clark
Phone: 207-509-7243
Email: pclark@unity.edu
Office: Parsons Wing, Office 201

Academic Background

MA, Theatre, University of Maine
BA, Speech Communications, University of Maine

Pat Clark has taught at Unity College since 1982 and loves the personal feel of the college. The number one fan for athletics (especially soccer and basketball), Pat teaches Oral Communication, Introduction to Drama, Interpersonal Relations, Unity Transfer Experience, Community Practices and Environmental Challenge. She coaches the Woodsmen's Team, serves as faculty sponsor for the Drama Club, and serves on the Alcohol and Other Drugs Presidential Committee. She is a liaison for students and instructors to the local community through her Presidency of the Unity Historical Society, as well as her duties as election clerk for the Town of Unity. She is noted for the bowl of candy in her office and her love of music, dancing and movies.

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Unity College faculty members are a mix of dedicated professionals, caring stewards of the earth, exceptional mentors, and fun-filled colleagues.
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Amy Arnett

Amy Arnett

Professor of Ecology / Director of the Center for Biodiversity/ Center for Biodiversity

Amy Arnett - Professor of Ecology / Director of the Center for Biodiversity
Phone: 207-509-7204
Email: aarnett@unity.edu
Office: Koons Hall, Office 126

Academic Background

Post-Doctorial Research, University of Nebraska
PhD, Biology, University of Vermont
BS, Biology, University of Michigan

I consider myself an ecology generalist. To me, this means that I am interested in multiple levels of questions in ecology -- including behavior, species-interactions, community structure, and biogeography. My research includes the study of the evolution of populations, the impact of invasive species on native communities, and more recently, the biodiversity of ant communities .

Some of the questions that my students and I are currently asking with ants is: What is the baseline level of fluctuation in ant communities, and how does this baseline differ across habitats? Do trends in indices of species diversity and relative abundance correlate with trends in climate measures, soil properties, tree species and growth rate, phenology, litterfall, or changes in land use? To address these questions, we are conducting systematic collections on Unity College campus properties and other locations in Maine, and correlating biodiversity indices with environmental characteristics. Ants are a common and dominant part of most terrestrial ecosystems, thus how and why these communities vary in size, abundance, and diversity, are great ecological questions.

Along with ecology, I enjoy thinking about how people teach science. The pedagogy of science teaching is an evolving and exciting field. I enjoy team-teaching in learning communities, service-learning projects, and have participated in an interdisciplinary mathematics and science course in a way that increases student grades and disposition in math.

In my spare time, I play the fiddle and ride my horse, Lady.